Traffic Management for High-Speed Networks: Fourth Lecture by Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and PDF

By Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, and Applications Commission on Physical Sciences Mathematics, Harvard University, Visit Amazon's H.T. Kung Page, search results, Learn ab

ISBN-10: 0309057981

ISBN-13: 9780309057981

ISBN-10: 0585084734

ISBN-13: 9780585084732

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Extra resources for Traffic Management for High-Speed Networks: Fourth Lecture International Science Lecture Series

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1/N, of the link bandwidth. Suppose that the VC's current buffer allocation X is insufficient for achieving this target bandwidth. That is, by Equations (2) and (4), or, equivalently, Page 12 Note that with the current allocation X, by Equation (2) the relative bandwidth that the VC can achieve satisfies: Since TQ << 2*RTT/3, it follows from Equation (5) and the last two inequalities above that: Thus the new allocation for the VC computed by Equation (3) will be strictly larger than X. In this way the buffer allocation for the VC will keep increasing after each round of new allocation, as long as the achievable bandwidth allowed by the current Buf_Alloc X is less than 1/N and the total queue length TQ is less than 2*RTT/3.

Heebner, Science Applications International Corporation (retired), Chair George M. Whitesides, Harvard University, Vice Chair Albert J. , The Baciocco Group, Inc. Alan Berman, Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University Norman E. Betaque, Logistics Management Institute Norval L. Broome, Mitre Corporation Gerald A. Cann, Raytheon Company Seymour J. Deitchman, Chevy Chase, Maryland, Special Advisor Anthony J. DeMaria, DeMaria ElectroOptics Systems, Inc. John F. Egan, Lockheed Martin Corporation Robert Hummel, Courant Institute of Mathematics, New York University David W.

In a static credit control, a fixed value of Buf_Alloc is used for the lifetime of a VC. Requiring only the implementation of CUP, or some equivalent protocol, the method is extremely simple. There are situations, however, where adaptive credit control is desirable. In order to allow a VC to operate at a high rate, Equation (2) implies that Buf_Alloc must be large relative to RTT + N2*N. Allocating a small buffer to a VC can prevent the VC from using otherwise available link bandwidth. On the other hand, committing a large buffer to a VC can be wasteful, because sometimes the VC may not have sufficient data, or may not be able to get enough scheduling slots, to transmit at the desired high rate.

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Traffic Management for High-Speed Networks: Fourth Lecture International Science Lecture Series by Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, and Applications Commission on Physical Sciences Mathematics, Harvard University, Visit Amazon's H.T. Kung Page, search results, Learn ab


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